Weekly Programs

 

One of the College’s most popular activities has been a series of weekly talks held at the Faculty Club during the academic year. The presenters are often Fellows reporting on their recent work, but outside speakers are also invited. The topics are wide-ranging and cover a broad spectrum of disciplines and subjects. The format calls for an approximately one-hour talk followed by a coffee break and then a discussion period. The talks are usually recorded and made available as either streaming or downloadable podcasts. The discussion sessions, which are often very lively, are not recorded. The sessions are so popular that seating is limited and Fellows are given priority although others are welcome if space permits.

 

Past Weekly Talks

 

Jan
22
Wed
2020
Senior College, University of Toronto Presents the Art Show: Andrew Baines, January 22, 2020, Senior College Centre, 11:00am-12:30pm @ Senior College Centre, Room 412
Jan 22 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

Art Show Opening with a Short Presentation by the Artist & Light Refreshments: Wednesday, January 22, 2020 at 11:00am-12:30pm.

The event is Free. All are welcome, but we do require registration by Monday, January 20, 2020.

Location 256 McCaul Street, Room 412.

The art show continues Monday to Friday, 10:00am-11:30am and 1:30-3:00pm. It is recommended that you make an appointment by calling (416) 978-7553.

The catalogue can be found at: https://seniorcollege.utoronto.ca/catalogue-andrew-baines-life-journey/.

 

AndrewBaines

 

Previous Shows

SC Talks: “Canada’s New Golden Age of Dinosaur Discovery” (Dinosaur Research at the U of T), David Evans, January 22, 2020, Faculty Club, 2-4pm @ The Faculty Club
Jan 22 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

All presentations will be held on Wednesday from 2:00pm- 4pm at the Faculty Club, 41 Willcocks Street. Programs are free for Fellows of Senior College, but RSVP is required. Members of Senior College who are not Fellows and visitors are asked to donate $10.00 to help defray costs. The Senior College Lunch (1:00pm) may be reserved for a reasonable fee with RSVP for the program. Registration. Registration opens up a week before the talk.

Contact and Chair: Contact and Chair:  Jim Gurd

The Talk: “Title: Canada’s New Golden Age of Dinosaur Discovery” by David Evans

In the last two decades, a large number of newly discovered dinosaur species from all over the world is enhancing our understanding of dinosaur diversity, the way they lived, and how they evolved.  Canada continues to play a major role in this new dinosaur revolution, contributing a surprisingly large number of new and spectacular species within the last few years. The rate of new discoveries in Canada is at its highest in almost a century- since the badlands were first explored.  Dr. David Evans, Associate Professor in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Senior Curator of Vertebrate Palaeontology at the Royal Ontario Museum will introduce you to some of Canada’s newest dinosaurs- including the recently described Wendiceratops.

Dr. David C. Evans
B.Sc., Integrated Sciences Program, University of British Columbia, 2003
Ph.D., Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 2007

Dr. David C. Evans holds the Temerty Chair in Vertebrate Palaeontology and oversees dinosaur research at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM). He is also an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Toronto, a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, and a Member of the Royal Society of Canada. David is an Ontario-born researcher who is recognized as an authority on the rich dinosaur fossil record of Canada, and has amassed over 100 scientific publications to date. As a Curator, David helped develop the ROM’s dinosaur galleries, and was Lead Curator of the major travelling exhibition Ultimate Dinosaurs. He has been featured on numerous television shows, and, notably, David was the Co-creator of the hit HISTORY TV series Dino Hunt (currently on Netflix).

David’s research focuses on the evolution, ecology and diversity of dinosaurs, and their relationship to environmental changes leading up to the end Cretaceous extinction event that wiped out the non-avian dinosaurs. His research strives to understand the causes and consequences of mass extinctions in order to better address our contemporary biodiversity crisis. Active in the field, he has participated in expeditions all over the world, including the Africa, Mongolia, and the Arctic, and has helped discover 12 new dinosaur species in the last decade- including the remarkable horned dinosaur Wendiceratops from southern Alberta, and the wickedly armored Zuul named after the Ghostbusters movie monster.

Twitter: @DavidEvans_ROM

Evans Lab Webpage: https://evanslab.wordpress.com/

Royal Ontario Museum Webpage: http://www.rom.on.ca/en/collections-research/rom-staff/david-c-evans

U of T Webpage: http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/people/d-faculty/Evans.htm

Dr. David Evans in front of the skeleton of Wendiceratops pinhornensis at the Royal Ontario Museum.

Jan
23
Thu
2020
Outing for Fellows Thursday, January 23rd at 10:45am, Royal Ontario Museum. Fellows only @ Royal Ontario Museum
Jan 23 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm

Outing for Fellows Thursday, January 23rd, 10:45am.
Royal Ontario Museum

Time: 10:45 am – 12:45pm

Lunch after the event: 1:00pm. Optional lunch in the Clay Restaurant at the Gardiner Museum across the street https://www.clay.restaurant (at your own expense)

Cost: No admission fee required for the ROM visit or the Gardiner Café.

Registration: Limited to 16 Fellows, so please register as soon as possible.

PLAN FOR THE EVENT

Meet at the President’s Choice School Entrance off Queen’s Park on the south side of the Museum next to the former Planetarium. at 10:45 A.M. https://www.rom.on.ca/en/whats-on/presidents-choice-school-entrance.

 

10:45am Behind the scenes in the Entomology Department at the Royal Ontario Museum with Sebastian Kvist, who spoke to Senior College about leeches in November 2018. https://www.rom.on.ca/en/collections-research/rom-staff/sebastian-kvist.

12:15pm Followed by a brief visit to the Herbarium’s collection of subarctic Ontario plants.

Please register at:

Jan
29
Wed
2020
SC Talks: “Refugee Voices”, Andrew Brouwer, Winnie Muchuba, Ilamaaran (Maaran) Nagarasa, Gustavo Gutierrez, January 29, 2020 @ The Faculty Club
Jan 29 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

All presentations will be held on Wednesday from 2:00pm- 4pm at the Faculty Club, 41 Willcocks Street. Programs are free for Fellows of Senior College, but RSVP is required. Members of Senior College who are not Fellows and visitors are asked to donate $10.00 to help defray costs. The Senior College Lunch (1:00pm) may be reserved for a reasonable fee with RSVP for the program. Registration. Registration opens up a week before the talk.

Contact and Chair: Contact and Chair:  Peter Hajnal

The Talk: “Refugee Voices” by Andrew Brouwer, Winnie Muchuba, Ilamaaran (Maaran) Nagarasa, Gustavo Gutierrez

Abstract: three former refugees, from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sri Lanka and Mexico, will tell their personal stories of the reasons they fled their countries, their journeys that eventually brought them to Canada, and how they have fared here. A presentation by a prominent refugee lawyer will round out the programme.

Gustavo Gutierrez was born in Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico, opposite Calexico, California, and raised in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, opposite El Paso, Texas.  He worked in the Department of Justice in Ciudad Juarez from 1999 to 2008; in 2000 he began work in the Homicides department where he was assigned to in 2002 to the Homicides of Females department.  In 2003 he joined the SWAT team in 2003 where he was promoted to team coordinator in 2005 and department coordinator in 2007; the following year he was promoted to Acting Regional Coordinator of Chihuahua’s North Zone.   In 2007 he received an award from the Governor of Chihuahua in recognition of successfully closed cases. He received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the Centro Universitario de Ciudad Juarez in 2005; he also received training certificates in crimes scene techniques and handling evidence.

Gustavo arrived at Pearson International Airport in Toronto on November 11, 2008, whereupon he was detained by immigration officers and sent to the West Detention centre for 7 days. He was released on bond with the obligation to sign in in person once a month for the next 5 years, until he received his Permanent Resident status on January 6, 2014. He first worked in the construction trade but, on completing the required training in December 2009, he obtained a permanent job as a security guard. In September 2010 he started a Bridge Training Program for International Mental Health Professionals which he completed on September 2011. He volunteered in the Ontario Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional services from 2011 to 2014; started work in the probation office in September 2014 until October 2017. Since October 2017 he has worked at the Ontario Ministry of Attorney General in the Indigenous Justice Division.

Winnie Muchuba earned a master’s degree in human Rights and International Human Rights at the Catholic University of Bukavu, DRC. She recently received the “badge of evidence” for Canada master’s equivalency by the World Education Service. She graduated from Niagara College in Enhanced Language Training for Employment, Winnie has been involved with a number of organizations in various capacities: she was a student intern at Kairos Canadian ecumenical justice initiatives, a trainee at immigrant women’s integration and leadership program, and an active member at Romero House and at the jubilee church in St Catharines. Though her experience volunteering in a women’s advisory capacity at Parkdale Health Centre in Toronto, she gained the strength to advocate for human rights issues and the fight against violence and discrimination that women face. She is now working with Bayshore home health for the care of the aging, volunteering with the Red Cross and with McMaster family medicine in the cardiovascular health awareness program, and the health Tapestry and the emergency risk management in the Niagara West and North region. She is Co-chair at the centre’s francophone women’s committee in Toronto.

Ilamaran Nagarasa, known as Maran, is a freelance journalist, human rights activist and refugee advocate who lives with his family in Toronto.  He is originally from Sri Lanka. Maran arrived in Canada in 2009 after travel along with 75 other refugees on the boat “Ocean Lady”. Maran has been very active in reporting human rights abuses in Sri Lanka for the past 16 years, including providing testimony at the United Nations Human Rights Commission in 2015. He currently works for a Toronto-based multicultural radio and a television as a news editor.

Andrew Brouwer is Legal Aid Ontario’s Senior Counsel in Refugee Law.  He was called to the bar in 2004.  He leads the organization’s refugee law test case program which is geared to improving access to justice for vulnerable non-citizens and refugees. He has appeared before all levels of court and immigration tribunal, including the Supreme Court of Canada and United Nations treaty bodies, and frequently testifies before Parliamentary committees studying immigration and refugee legislation. Andrew is a member of the Canadian Association of Refugee Lawyers (he served for a term as Vice-President and previously co-chaired its Litigation and Advocacy committees). He advises the Canadian Council for Refugees in addition to working with the Institute for Human Resource Professionals on their immigration detention projects. Andrew has written and advocated on issues relating to statelessness, interdiction, refugee protection and immigration detention. He is currently representing the Canadian Council for Refugees, Amnesty International and the Canadian Council of Churches in their constitutional challenge to the Canada-US Safe Third Country Agreement. He is also active in the Sanctuary Movement.

Feb
4
Tue
2020
SENIOR COLLEGE BOOK CLUB, February 4, 2020 John Suchet, Beethoven: The Man Revealed- Fellows and External Fellows only @ Senior College Centre, Room 412A
Feb 4 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

SENIOR COLLEGE BOOK CLUB

The book club sessions are open to all Fellows & External Fellows of Senior College on a first-come, first served basis until the maximum number of participants is reached.

Feb 4, 2020: John Suchet, Beethoven: The Man Revealed.

Attention Book Club Members:

For those intending to come to the next session on February 4th to discuss John Suchet, Beethoven: The Man Revealed, please note that there are only limited numbers of copies in Toronto bookstores. However, Toronto Public Libraries have 21 copies and 2 ebooks available.  Other libraries will also have copies.  Then there is Amazon. Good luck!

Optional Extract: Joseph Kerman, Beethoven
(Chairs: Deanne Bogdan & David Milne

We celebrate the 250th anniversary year of Beethoven’s birth with this engaging, non-technical biography that captures the man and his genius.

MUSICAL LINKS FOR BEETHOVEN BOOKCLUB SESSION

Deanne and I hope that you will enjoy the first biography in the Bookclub series.  As the subtitle to the Beethoven work indicates, the biography aims to ‘reveal’ the ‘man’ behind the legends, myths, and music. This makes it an interesting and accessible read. But since Beethoven was above all a composer, we think his music should accompany and complement the book.  In that spirit, we have selected some of his music in the following links for you to enjoy beforehand.  The first group includes performances of a piano sonata and concerto, symphonies, and chamber music: music that really needs no words.  We encourage you quite simply to listen to Beethoven, to ‘hear’ him and to think on what his music is saying to us.

(1) ‘Appassionata’ Piano Sonata https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ak_7tTxZrk

(2) 9th Symphony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3217H8JppI

(3) 4th Piano Concerto https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asggwOLTL3Q

(4) Eroica Symphony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbGV-MVfgec

(5) Cavatina from the String Quartet Op 130
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbAoCjQdKYg (The Lindsay String Quartet)

 

INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEOS

Here in this second group of musical links, we have chosen two highly interesting videos that show the compositional virtuosity of Beethoven’s music. See him here hard at work,

bringing the composer’s craft to perfection. The Glossary that follows can be printed and used as an explanatory guide to terms used in the video commentaries.

  1. Gerard Schwartz, conductor, analysis of the 5th Symphony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4hZY5h84Wc

  2. “Superb Craftsmanship” in the Finale  of the Eroica Symphony” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vZ1I122JNo

Glossary

sonata form – a musical structure consisting of three main sections: exposition, development, recapitulation. Sonata form and tonality are foundational to mid-18th century Classical Style.

tonality – (a) the character of a piece of music as determined by the key in which it is written/played, or the relations between the rules of a scale or key;
— (b) the arrangement of pitches and/or chords of a musical work in a hierarchy of perceived relations, stabilities, attractions, and directionality within which the single pitch of a triadic chord (doh, mi, sol) with the greatest stability is the tonic (doh)

theme and variations – a musical form organized by a main melody and one or more variations on that melody.

counterpoint/contrapuntal – the relationship between voices that are harmonically interdependent yet independent in rhythm and contour.

fugue/fugal — a contrapuntal musical form in which a short melody (the subject) is introduced by one part and successively taken up by others parts, and is developed by interweaving parts.

contra dance – a piece of folk music or tune in which couples face each other in two lines or a square. In this video “the Prometheus theme” is termed “the contra dance theme/melody.”

triplet – a portion of musical time that’s been split into three equal notes within a single beat.

ostinato – a repeating musical subject

counter-subject — a secondary subject or its answer in a fugue.

inversion – rearrangement of top-to-bottom elements in a melody, chord, or contrapuntal musical lines.

chorale — a melody harmonized in four parts (often sung), with the melody in the soprano line.

crescendo – a term used for gradually getting louder; decrescendo or diminuendo, for gradually getting softer.

The Book Club Committee invites fellows to propose books for inclusion in the program series. We intend to offer works — fiction and non-fiction — that command our attention or address themes of public importance. Contact David Milne at dmilne70@gmail.com to Propose a Book.

The current line up can be found at this link https://seniorcollege.utoronto.ca/wp-admin/post.php?post=4540&action=edit&classic-editor .

Feb
5
Wed
2020
SC Talks: “Retirement and its Discontents”, Michelle Pannor Silver, February 5, 2020 @ The Faculty Club
Feb 5 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

All presentations will be held on Wednesday from 2:00pm- 4pm at the Faculty Club, 41 Willcocks Street. Programs are free for Fellows of Senior College, but RSVP is required. Members of Senior College who are not Fellows and visitors are asked to donate $10.00 to help defray costs. The Senior College Lunch (1:00pm) may be reserved for a reasonable fee with RSVP for the program. Registration. Registration opens up a week before the talk.

Contact and Chair: Contact and Chair: Michael Hutcheon

The Talk: “Retirement and its Discontents” by Michelle Pannor Silver

Feb
12
Wed
2020
SC Talks: “The Carding Controversy”, Justice Michael H. Tulloch, Ontario Court of Appeal, February 12, 2020 @ The Faculty Club
Feb 12 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

All presentations will be held on Wednesday from 2:00pm- 4pm at the Faculty Club, 41 Willcocks Street. Programs are free for Fellows of Senior College, but RSVP is required. Members of Senior College who are not Fellows and visitors are asked to donate $10.00 to help defray costs. The Senior College Lunch (1:00pm) may be reserved for a reasonable fee with RSVP for the program. Registration. Registration opens up a week before the talk.

Contact and Chair: Contact and Chair: Carl Baar

The Talk: “The Carding Controversy” by Justice Michael H. Tulloch, Ontario Court of Appeal

Feb
19
Wed
2020
SC Talks: “Reckoning and Reconciliation: Writing about Canada and Christianity on Turtle Island”, Pamela Klassen Professor of the Study of Religion, February 19, 2020 @ The Faculty Club
Feb 19 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

All presentations will be held on Wednesday from 2:00pm- 4pm at the Faculty Club, 41 Willcocks Street. Programs are free for Fellows of Senior College, but RSVP is required. Members of Senior College who are not Fellows and visitors are asked to donate $10.00 to help defray costs. The Senior College Lunch (1:00pm) may be reserved for a reasonable fee with RSVP for the program. Registration. Registration opens up a week before the talk.

Contact and Chair: Contact and Chair: Linda Hutcheon

The Talk: “Reckoning and Reconciliation: Writing about Canada and Christianity on Turtle Island ” by Pamela Klassen

Abstract:

Canada is in the midst of a fragile, flawed, and contested process of “nation-to-nation reconciliation” between Indigenous nations and the Crown.As a Canadian scholar in the field of “North American religions”, I’ve found it to be a profound and existential challenge to figure out how to write about Indigenous histories of Turtle Island (aka North America) in the context of this wider process. In this talk, I will reflect on how my recent research—which has taken the form of both a book and a website—has given me a chance to face this challenge by writing in different voices, with different research relationships and audiences in play.

Bio:

Pamela Klassen, FRSC, is Professor in the Department for the Study of Religion, cross-appointed to Anthropology, at the University of Toronto. Her most recent books are: The Story of Radio Mind: A Missionary’s Journey on Indigenous Land (U Chicago Press, 2018), the co-authored Ekklesia: Three Inquiries in Church and State (U Chicago Press, 2018), and the co-edited The Public Work of Christmas: Difference and Belonging in Multicultural Societies (MQUP, 2019). Together with a team of students from U of T and community members from Kay-Nah-Chi-Wah-Nung Historical Centre and the Rainy River First Nations, she directs a digital storytelling project called “Kiinawin Kawindomowin Story Nations” at storynations.utoronto.ca. She currently holds the Anneliese Maier Research Award from Germany’s Humboldt Foundation, in support of a five-year international project entitled “Religion and Public Memory in Multicultural Societies.”